Proskauer on Advertising Law
Proskauer on Advertising Law
Lawrence Weinstein

Lawrence Weinstein

Partner and Co-Head, False Advertising & Trademark Practice

Larry Weinstein is a partner in Proskauer's Litigation Department. He is co-head of the firm’s Intellectual Property Litigation Group, and also co-head of the firm’s False Advertising & Trademark Practice. Larry is a distinguished trial lawyer and counselor who concentrates on Lanham Act and consumer class action false advertising litigation, as well as NAD proceedings, trademark, trade secret and copyright litigation and sports, art and other complex commercial cases.

Larry’s clients include medical device and pharmaceutical companies and other owners and advertisers of the world’s most well-recognized brands, as well as sports governing bodies, teams and leagues, an environmental organization, hospitals and art collectors.

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Can Inflating Jury Verdicts and Settlements Injure More than Just Your Reputation? Kansas Law Firm Sues Competitor For False Advertising

It’s not every day that a law firm sues a competing firm for false advertising. Earlier this month, however, a Wichita, Kansas personal injury law firm did just that. Brave Law Firm sued rival firm Truck Accident Lawyer’s Group and allegedly related entities in the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, alleging violations … Continue Reading

Game Over: Supreme Court Denies Plaintiff’s Class Certification Appeal after Voluntary Dismissal in Xbox 360 Lawsuit

Recently, the Supreme Court in Microsoft Corp. v. Baker, 137 S. Ct. 1702 (2017), held that the plaintiff in a putative class action involving Xbox 360 game consoles could not appeal from the District Court’s denial of class certification after plaintiff voluntarily dismissed his claims with prejudice.  While 28 U.S.C. § 1291 allows appeals from final … Continue Reading

Eleventh Circuit Does Not Skim Over First Amendment Concerns in Labeling Milk

Be careful not to skim over potential First Amendment challenges to commercial speech regulations in labeling cases. By ‘whey’ of example, the Eleventh Circuit recently found that the actions of the Florida Commissioner of Agriculture and the Chief of the Florida Bureau of Dairy Industry violated Ocheesee Creamery LLC’s First Amendment rights related to the … Continue Reading

Michigan District Court Won’t Hear Lanham Act Claim Against Tinnitus Treatment Certifier

Last week, we covered a summary judgment decision holding that posts on the “Science-Based Medicine” blog were not “commercial speech” under the Lanham Act, and therefore the defendant in that case was not liable for false advertising in violation of that statute. In a similar recent decision, a judge in the Eastern District of Michigan … Continue Reading

Elsevier Wins Summary Judgment Over Use of 3-D Medical Animations in Copyright Case

Although this blog typically focuses on legal developments in marketing and false advertising, its authors and editors are of course active legal practitioners in related areas of IP and other creative industries. Proskauer recently received a favorable summary judgment decision for the defendant, its client Elsevier, Inc., a leading publisher in the fields of science, … Continue Reading

California Court Issues Surprising Decision in Discount Advertising Case

On December 15, 2016, the California Court of Appeals in Los Angeles came to a surprising summary judgment decision in Sajid Veera et al. v. Banana Republic, LLC.  The court held that plaintiffs who claimed they were misled by 40% off signs raised a triable issue of whether they suffered an injury-in-fact even though they … Continue Reading

When the Strength of the Facts Cannot be Lifted – SDNY Dismisses Muscle Maker Slack-Fill Class Action

The Southern District of New York recently dismissed a putative class action against Cytosport, the maker of Muscle Milk protein powder. The plaintiff, Orlando Bautista, alleged that he bought a container of Muscle Milk protein powder for $28 but was “surprised and disappointed” to discover that the package contained roughly 30% empty space. The suit … Continue Reading

IntenseX False Advertising Claims Lack Power and Performance

Last month, in Kanfer v. Pharmacare US, Inc., U.S. District Judge Marilyn Huff of the Southern District of California dismissed on what were essentially puffery grounds a consumer suit styled as a class action alleging that defendant PharmaCare falsely advertised its nutritional supplement, IntenseX, as an aphrodisiac that “would improve. . .sexual power and performance.” … Continue Reading

Standing to Assert Injunctive Relief is Not in the Tea Leaves, Court Says

In Lanovaz v. Twinings North America, Inc., Judge Whyte of the Northern District of California recently decided that the plaintiff lacked standing to pursue injunctive relief, and granted summary judgment for defendant Twinings.  The class action alleged that Twinings tea products were misbranded under California law as “natural source[s] of antioxidants.”… Continue Reading

Accurate Net Weight Disclosures May Defeat Slack-Fill Claims in California

Last April, we reported on Ebner v. Fresh, Inc., in which a Ninth Circuit panel held that the plaintiff failed to state a claim that Sugar lip balm packaging was misleading because it contained non-functional “slack-fill.” Last month, the Ninth Circuit rejected plaintiff’s petition for rehearing en banc but also amended its earlier opinion. Though … Continue Reading

De-certifiably Natural – Ninth Circuit Finds “All Natural” Label May be Misleading While Upholding Class Decertification

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently reversed in part and affirmed in part a Northern District of California ruling (discussed previously, here) concerning the “All Natural Fruit” labeling on Dole’s packaged fruit products. Brazil v. Dole Packaged Foods, LLC, No. 14-17480, 2016 WL 5539863 (9th Cir. Sept. 30, 2016). The appeals court reversed the lower court’s … Continue Reading

A Wrinkle in Time: Anti-Aging Advertising Claims Unsubstantiated by Testing Methods

The National Advertising Division (NAD)’s annual conference is taking place later this month, so we are taking the opportunity to highlight some recent NAD decisions of interest.  This post addresses Intraceuticals LLC (Atoxelene Skin Care Products), NAD Case No. 5953 (May 2016). As part of its ongoing monitoring program, NAD reviewed Intraceuticals’ advertising claims that … Continue Reading

Don’t Pick Me Off: Are Pre-Certification Claims Mooted By Deposited Full Settlement Offers?

On January 20, 2016, the Supreme Court held in Campbell-Ewald v. Gomez, 136 S. Ct. 663, 672, 193 L. Ed. 2d 571 (2016) that an unaccepted pre-certification settlement offer of complete relief in a putative class action, made to an individual plaintiff, does not moot that plaintiff’s claims.  As discussed in our previous coverage of … Continue Reading

Sugar Rush: FDA Rejects Use of “Evaporated Cane Juice” to Describe Sweeteners

For years, food companies have been using the term “evaporated cane juice” in the ingredients list on food products. This has resulted in a number of lawsuits by consumers claiming that the term misled them into thinking those products did not contain sugar, including this failed putative class action against KIND.  In May 2016, the … Continue Reading

“KIND” of Nutritious—FDA Permits “Healthy” Label and Agrees to Rethink Its Definition of “Healthy” Foods

The Food and Drug Administration has kindly permitted Kind LLC to use the term “healthy” on its snack bars again, but with the caveat that the term must only be used in text clearly presented as part of Kind’s corporate philosophy, and not as a claim about the products’ nutrient content.… Continue Reading

Parks’ Allegations Against “Finest” Franks Not In the “Ball Park” of False Advertising Claims

On May 10, 2016, Judge Joseph F. Leeson, Jr. of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania granted summary judgment on false advertising and trademark claims in favor of defendant Tyson Foods, Inc. and a subsidiary, the makers of “Park’s Finest” frankfurters. The decision illustrates important distinctions between two causes of action—trademark infringement and false advertising—both covered … Continue Reading

Supreme Court: Class Action Plaintiffs Must Show ‘Concrete’ Harm to Satisfy Article III

In a 6-2 decision, the Supreme Court, in an opinion authored by Justice Alito, held that the Ninth Circuit’s Article III standing analysis in Robins v. Spokeo was incomplete because it focused solely on whether the plaintiff had alleged a particularized injury, and failed to assess whether the alleged injury was “concrete”.  Although Spokeo was … Continue Reading

Stars Fail to Align for P&G, as Supreme Court Rejects Class Certification Appeal

Readers may recall our coverage in recent months of the challenge by Procter & Gamble (P&G) to an order certifying a multi-state consumer class in a case asserting that P&G falsely advertised its probiotic supplement Align. Last August, a divided panel of the Sixth Circuit affirmed class certification. In October, the Sixth Circuit stayed its … Continue Reading

Not Sweet Enough: Ninth Circuit Tosses Claims Over Fresh Sugar Lip Balm Labeling and Packaging

Plaintiff Angela Ebner filed a putative class action against Fresh, Inc. alleging that the label, design and packaging of its Sugar lip balms deceived consumers about the amount of available product. In a published panel decision, the Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s ruling dismissing the plaintiff’s complaint in its entirety. Sugar lip balm, which … Continue Reading

California District Court Unplugs Duracell False Advertising Suit

Recently, Judge Lucy H. Koh of the Northern District of California dismissed a putative class action claiming that Procter & Gamble and Gillette deceptively advertised Duracell Coppertop AA and AAA batteries. Defendants advertised the batteries as having “Duralock Power Preserve Technology,” which, according to the challenged advertising, made them “GUARANTEED for 10 YEARS in storage.”  … Continue Reading

New York Court Rules Rule 67 Deposit Cannot be Used to Pick Off Named Plaintiffs in Putative Diet Pill Class

Recently, a New York court held that a putative class action defendant’s depositing of funds sufficient to cover the full amount of a plaintiff’s individual claims does not moot the plaintiff’s case and therefore cannot be used as a vehicle to defeat the individual plaintiff’s attempt certify a class. This was the first attempt by … Continue Reading
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